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1993-2001: The Second Series Comics

The Jim Balent era

1993 saw the beginning of the real Catwoman comic book series. It had a distinct look, thanks to the efforts of Jim Balent. For much of this time, she was featured in a purple Cat-suit, with long boots, long hair flowing out, and a devil-may-care attitude. She was also drawn by Mr. Balent as a woman with a figure to make any woman jealous.

The comic book series was not only spurred on from the 1989 comic book mini-series, but also (no doubt) from the 1992 movie, Batman Returns. This comic book series became a hit, in part from Mr. Balent's pencilling. He drew Catwoman as a figure with a physique to match the Playboy Playmate for December 1968, Cynthia Myers.

Mr. Balent continued to work with DC Comics until 1999, when he left. 2000 brings a new creative team to the Catwoman comic and a new look for Catty (the costume change actually occurred in Catwoman #68). Her hair was cut shorter, and Bronwyn Carlson, Staz Johnson and Wayne Faucher delivered a grittier, more realistic Catwoman. They did this by promptly throwing her in jail! This issue, which appeared in 2000, was controversial, because it showed Catwoman/Selina Kyle in a shower scene with other female inmates.

Not only was there the comic book series, but there were also annual issues published and, in 1997, an issue with Catwoman and Vampirella, Catwoman Vampirella Furies.

This comic book series came to an end in 2001, with issue #93. By this time, Catwoman/Selina Kyle is facing conflicts within herself, and tries to perform one last caper. She runs afoul of Deathstroke the Terminator, and a destructive battle ended with the world believing Catwoman to be dead.

She certainly appeared to be dead.

Or was she?